SALSA STORIES is a series of public event that combines TV show screenings with live music and dance performances, permitted by Open Culture program by Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO). The video showcases people from the salsa community who share true events that tell the history and culture of salsa, and it is screened on an LED mobile billboard truck. Live performances are presented by salsa musicians, dancers and DJs.

LOCATION: LOWER EAST SIDE: Suffolk Street Between Rivington & Delancey Streets, New York.

DATES: JULY: 8th, 15th, 22nd, 29th | AUGUST: 5th, 12th, 19th, 26th | SEPTEMBER: 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th.

SPONSORSHIP PACKAGES

Contributions are TAX DEDUCTIBLE and should be

made out to NEW YORK WOMEN IN FILM & TELEVISION

PLATINUM TIER - $3,500

  • Full color logo advertisement and commercial video displayed on both sides of the big board for 20 seconds in the sponsorship rotation throughout the event. 

  • Shoutouts before, after and between performances & screening.    

  • Shoutout post on the social media event pages.

GOLD TIER - $ 2,000    

  • Full color logo advertisement displayed on both sides of the big board for 10 seconds in the sponsorship rotation throughout the event.        

  • Single shoutout before performance or screening.

  • Shoutout post on the social media event pages.

SILVER TIER - $ 1,000         

  • Medium text logo advertisements displayed with other silver sponsors on both sides of the big board for 10 seconds in the sponsorship rotation throughout the event.         

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BRONZE TIER - $ 500            

  • Small text logo advertisements displayed with other bronze sponsors on both sides of the big board for 10 seconds in the sponsorship rotation throughout the event.

*Per Event

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Outdoor Dancing NYC
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Outdoor Dancing by the Piers

KEY DEMOGRAPHICS

• Age range: 30 - 65

• Gender: 55% M - 45% F

• Income: 25k - 70k

KEY PSYCHOGRAPHICS

• Strong family values

• Moderate drinkers

• Eat-at-home more often

CURRENT CHALLENGES

• Lack of opportunities for social interaction

• Lack of a safely monitored physical space

PREFERRED CHANNELS

Social media: mostly Facebook and Instagram

Instant messaging:  WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, Text/iMessage

PREFERRED CONTENT

• YouTube videos

• Web

WHY

Back when NYC was the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic the dance community continued to gather to dance, mostly self-organizing through group pages on social media, practicing unsafe behaviors. That immediately took me back to the AIDS crisis in 1991. I saw many similarities between the COVID-19 pandemic and the AIDS epidemic regarding the abandonment of minority communities. The AIDS crisis relied on activists such as Larry Kramer from Act Up, to speak out against inaction. The dance community has had nobody, not even to identify the need and urgency. Since the pandemic first broke, the social dance community is stuck between business-oriented promoters and politics. The fact is that social dancers will continue to dance. This practice goes beyond a lifestyle. It’s their cultural identity. Therefore enforcing the community to stop dancing during the pandemic is the same as asking people to stop having sex during the AIDS epidemic. The strategy must be to provide a structured safe environment for the dance community to exercise their cultural identity.  When the City Council passed a legislation that allows for artists to apply for permits to perform outdoors in open spaces, I saw an opportunity to take action and help rebuild my dance community from the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. Before the pandemic hit, NYC was home to hundreds of social dancing spots where people from all five boroughs and surrounding states came together, usually in dance studios, ballrooms, and outdoor public spaces. The pandemic has drastically affected cultural venues, small businesses, and the real estate industry in these areas. The closure of these businesses has greatly jeopardized the very existence of the social dancing culture in the city. Iconic venues such as the nightclub Copacabana (1940-2020) were forced to close their doors and the dance community is now faced with fear and uncertainty with no prospect of what lies ahead. Social dancers are now faced with a major cultural identity crisis and are in crucial need to reconnect to themselves through their communities. With the vast majority of the traditional venues that hosted long-run socials having closed, I identified the urgency in the salsa dance community to restore a fragile cultural identity and have dedicated in helping reassess the dance culture. Once again, NYC is home to reinventing and innovating, as it did back in the ’70s with Salsa and Hip Hop.

NYC Street Dancing
NYC Live Perfomance
NYC Street Dancing
NYC Street Dancing
NYC Street Dancing
NYC Street Dancing

SUPPORT

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PARTNERS

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AWARD-WINNER

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FISCAL SPONSOR

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¡Thank you for supporting Salsa Stories!
Your contribution will help reconstruct the social fabric of the communities that define New York City as the most diverse place on the planet!

info@bianka.nyc | 1 (917) 742-3007 

Handmade in the heart of NYC - the cradle of salsa © 2021